Free tea, anxious toes, Handforth headlines, BYOB and repaying Sybil

We now live in a world in which TV travel programmes feature the delights of … Weatherfield.  Seriously.  I’m not holding my breath for sojourns to exotic climes this year, but I’m hoping that, by the summer, I’ll at least be able to go a bit further than Media City.  Not that there’s anything wrong with Media City, I hasten to add.  Joanna Lumley, who was presenting the programme, was very lucky to be able to sit in the Rovers Return with Ken Barlow, because future scripts are being rewritten, so it looks as if the Rovers’ll be back to doing takeaways only.  Rather like The Coffee Sack near chez moi.  I have only recently discovered that the said Coffee Sack does the most lovely scones.  However, this morning, when I went in, disaster struck.  There were no scones.  The man said that, not expecting many customers in this awful weather, he’d only made half a dozen, and someone had come in and bought the lot.  How dare they?!

I must have looked so devastated, even behind the mask, that he said I could have a cup of tea for free.  I did offer to pay for it – it’s not as if he’s contractually obliged to provide me with a weekly scone, after all – but no, he insisted.  Free tea, to make up for the disappointment!   How nice is that?  It’s little things like that which make this very difficult time bearable.  As for the person who bought six scones, I shall assume that they were either a) very hungry or b) part of a large household, rather than that they were planning anything nefarious.  Welcome to Lockdown-land, in which buying six scones could be construed as being suspicious.  Anyway.  Three cheers for free cups of tea!

(Apologies for anyone who’s got this in WP reader and can see it three times, but the good news is that I’ve now worked out that the Facebook app wants big pictures and small titles.  It used to prefer small pictures.  So I now need to post with a big picture and small title, share it on Facebook, then change the picture to a larger one and, if necessary, add in the rest of the title.  It never used to be so difficult!!)

As for anxious toes, one of the many weird things about living with anxiety is that random bits of you start to hurt even though there isn’t very much physically wrong with them.  On Thursday night, whilst moving the furniture in the front room around so that I could hoover, I stubbed my toe on the settee.  Ouch.  Then I woke up at two o’clock in the morning, in so much pain with this toe that I had to take two ibuprofen.  I knew jolly well that it was anxiety pains and not actual pains, because stubbed toes do not still hurt eight hours later, but this is what happens.  It can be knees, backs, stomachs, whatever.  I don’t even know exactly what it was all about, and this is something else that happens.  Was it anxiety about how fat I am?  Scones aside, I am really trying hard to lose weight, but it’s not working 😦 .  Was it because my car was going in for its MOT that day?  Was it to do with phone updates (these stress me out like mad)?  Was it to do with the Australian Open?  Quite possibly: I am extremely stressed about Rafa’s bad back.  But I don’t actually know.  So, if anyone’s reading this, and knows how to read the minds of anxious toes, do please let me know.

Pretty much everyone’s a bit stressed out at the moment.  That’s why it’s so nice to be on the receiving end of an act of kindness such as the free cup of tea.  It was particularly nice because there has been quite a bit of nastiness around in recent days.  The worst of it was from the small minority of people who tried to use the death of Captain Sir Tom Moore to attack the government and score political points, and even, in the case of one vile vicar, to accuse the whole country of being racist.  What is wrong with some people?  Whatever your political views may be, don’t start dragging the death of a lovely, kind-hearted old man who lifted everyone’s spirits into them.  I just hope that the Moore family weren’t too upset by it.

Please be nice to people.  It’s upsetting to be criticised because you’ve bought something from Amazon, even though most other shops are closed and it’s none of anyone else’s business where you buy from anyway, or for trying to cheer yourself up with a nice cake which happened to be served a polystyrene box, and even more upsetting when, after congratulating someone on their work being featured in a national newspaper, someone attacks both of you because the newspaper concerned doesn’t meet with their approval.  Then there are the people slagging off anyone hoping to go on holiday this summer as being irresponsible.  These comments come from people who live in rural areas and don’t work, needless to say, not from people who are chained to office computers for five days a week and are getting rather tired of only being able to walk round housing estates and the same local parks in their little free time.   We need a break, OK.

But there are a lot of lovely people out there.  And free tea is much appreciated!

Rest in peace, Captain Sir Tom.  You were a wonderful man.  And I was also sad to hear of the death of Christopher Plummer.  I would so have married Captain von Trapp, although I’m not sure about taking on seven children.  And, yes, I do know that he got frustrated about for ever being associated with The Sound of Music, but what a wonderful film with which to be associated!  I just typed “to be associated with”, looked at it in horror, and correct it!

To go back to the MOT, hooray, my car passed without needing anything more than a new windscreen wiper blade.  Strange times at the garage, though.  No chairs for customers.  Everything to be taken out of the car.  And I was sent several e-mails asking me to drive to the garage with all the windows open, to let the air circulate, but I’m afraid that I ignored those.  The garage is only three miles away, but there are a lot of traffic lights between here and there, and sitting in a stationary car with all the windows open is really not a good idea, especially when you’re a lone female.  Sorry, garage.  But I did stick to all your other rules.

Other things happening this week have included a video of a meeting of Handforth Parish Council going viral.  You know, Handforth, where the big John Lewis is?  Remember that, from the olden days, when we used to do things like going to shops.  I met my cousin for a drink in the cafe there once.  Remember those days?  Not only could you go into shops, but you could sit down in cafes, and you could even meet your friends and relations!   I feel like I should have the Hovis advert music playing.

Local elections are to go ahead, but it’ll be BYOB.  No, not bring your own bottle.  Bring your own biro.

And there’s also been talk of extending the term over which the government support loans for businesses hit by restrictions are to be repaid.  There are two different types of loans available to affected small businesses, depending on which one best suits their circumstances – the bounceback loans, and the Coronavirus Business Interruption Loans.  Due to HMRC’s obsession with acronyms, the latter are known as CBILs, pronounced “Sybils”.  We are in a severe economic crisis, thanks to this horrible virus, and it’s feared that up to 15% of small businesses may not survive.  There’s certainly nothing funny about it.  But, every time I hear someone going on about “Sybils”, I half-expect Prunella Scales to turn up and start shouting at John Cleese to repay his loan.  A small hotel would definitely need a loan.  But let’s hope that we’ll be back in small hotels, or any other accommodation of your choice, this summer.

In the meantime, here’s to tea and scones.  Oh, and I got a scone from M&S in the end.  But the ones from The Coffee Sack are nicer!  I shall be back there next week, at whatever time best fits in with the night session at the Australian Open, hoping for better luck 🙂 .

 

 

(This is here twice because I was trying to get the picture to display on Facebook!)

 

Free tea, anxious toes, Handforth headlines, BYOB and repaying Sybil

We now live in a world in which TV travel programmes feature the delights of … Weatherfield.  Seriously.  I’m not holding my breath for sojourns to exotic climes this year, but I’m hoping that, by the summer, I’ll at least be able to go a bit further than Media City.  Not that there’s anything wrong with Media City, I hasten to add.  Joanna Lumley, who was presenting the programme, was very lucky to be able to sit in the Rovers Return with Ken Barlow, because future scripts are being rewritten, so it looks as if the Rovers’ll be back to doing takeaways only.  Rather like The Coffee Sack near chez moi.  I have only recently discovered that the said Coffee Sack does the most lovely scones.  However, this morning, when I went in, disaster struck.  There were no scones.  The man said that, not expecting many customers in this awful weather, he’d only made half a dozen, and someone had come in and bought the lot.  How dare they?!

I must have looked so devastated, even behind the mask, that he said I could have a cup of tea for free.  I did offer to pay for it – it’s not as if he’s contractually obliged to provide me with a weekly scone, after all – but no, he insisted.  Free tea, to make up for the disappointment!   How nice is that?  It’s little things like that which make this very difficult time bearable.  As for the person who bought six scones, I shall assume that they were either a) very hungry or b) part of a large household, rather than that they were planning anything nefarious.  Welcome to Lockdown-land, in which buying six scones could be construed as being suspicious.  Anyway.  Three cheers for free cups of tea!

As for anxious toes, one of the many weird things about living with anxiety is that random bits of you start to hurt even though there isn’t very much physically wrong with them.  On Thursday night, whilst moving the furniture in the front room around so that I could hoover, I stubbed my toe on the settee.  Ouch.  Then I woke up at two o’clock in the morning, in so much pain with this toe that I had to take two ibuprofen.  I knew jolly well that it was anxiety pains and not actual pains, because stubbed toes do not still hurt eight hours later, but this is what happens.  It can be knees, backs, stomachs, whatever.  I don’t even know exactly what it was all about, and this is something else that happens.  Was it anxiety about how fat I am?  Scones aside, I am really trying hard to lose weight, but it’s not working 😦 .  Was it because my car was going in for its MOT that day?  Was it to do with phone updates (these stress me out like mad)?  Was it to do with the Australian Open?  Quite possibly: I am extremely stressed about Rafa’s bad back.  But I don’t actually know.  So, if anyone’s reading this, and knows how to read the minds of anxious toes, do please let me know.

Pretty much everyone’s a bit stressed out at the moment.  That’s why it’s so nice to be on the receiving end of an act of kindness such as the free cup of tea.  It was particularly nice because there has been quite a bit of nastiness around in recent days.  The worst of it was from the small minority of people who tried to use the death of Captain Sir Tom Moore to attack the government and score political points, and even, in the case of one vile vicar, to accuse the whole country of being racist.  What is wrong with some people?  Whatever your political views may be, don’t start dragging the death of a lovely, kind-hearted old man who lifted everyone’s spirits into them.  I just hope that the Moore family weren’t too upset by it.

Please be nice to people.  It’s upsetting to be criticised because you’ve bought something from Amazon, even though most other shops are closed and it’s none of anyone else’s business where you buy from anyway, or for trying to cheer yourself up with a nice cake which happened to be served a polystyrene box, and even more upsetting when, after congratulating someone on their work being featured in a national newspaper, someone attacks both of you because the newspaper concerned doesn’t meet with their approval.  Then there are the people slagging off anyone hoping to go on holiday this summer as being irresponsible.  These comments come from people who live in rural areas and don’t work, needless to say, not from people who are chained to office computers for five days a week and are getting rather tired of only being able to walk round housing estates and the same local parks in their little free time.   We need a break, OK.

But there are a lot of lovely people out there.  And free tea is much appreciated!

Rest in peace, Captain Sir Tom.  You were a wonderful man.  And I was also sad to hear of the death of Christopher Plummer.  I would so have married Captain von Trapp, although I’m not sure about taking on seven children.  And, yes, I do know that he got frustrated about for ever being associated with The Sound of Music, but what a wonderful film with which to be associated!  I just typed “to be associated with”, looked at it in horror, and correct it!

To go back to the MOT, hooray, my car passed without needing anything more than a new windscreen wiper blade.  Strange times at the garage, though.  No chairs for customers.  Everything to be taken out of the car.  And I was sent several e-mails asking me to drive to the garage with all the windows open, to let the air circulate, but I’m afraid that I ignored those.  The garage is only three miles away, but there are a lot of traffic lights between here and there, and sitting in a stationary car with all the windows open is really not a good idea, especially when you’re a lone female.  Sorry, garage.  But I did stick to all your other rules.

Other things happening this week have included a video of a meeting of Handforth Parish Council going viral.  You know, Handforth, where the big John Lewis is?  Remember that, from the olden days, when we used to do things like going to shops.  I met my cousin for a drink in the cafe there once.  Remember those days?  Not only could you go into shops, but you could sit down in cafes, and you could even meet your friends and relations!   I feel like I should have the Hovis advert music playing.

Local elections are to go ahead, but it’ll be BYOB.  No, not bring your own bottle.  Bring your own biro.

And there’s also been talk of extending the term over which the government support loans for businesses hit by restrictions are to be repaid.  There are two different types of loans available to affected small businesses, depending on which one best suits their circumstances – the bounceback loans, and the Coronavirus Business Interruption Loans.  Due to HMRC’s obsession with acronyms, the latter are known as CBILs, pronounced “Sybils”.  We are in a severe economic crisis, thanks to this horrible virus, and it’s feared that up to 15% of small businesses may not survive.  There’s certainly nothing funny about it.  But, every time I hear someone going on about “Sybils”, I half-expect Prunella Scales to turn up and start shouting at John Cleese to repay his loan.  A small hotel would definitely need a loan.  But let’s hope that we’ll be back in small hotels, or any other accommodation of your choice, this summer.

In the meantime, here’s to tea and scones.  Oh, and I got a scone from M&S in the end.  But the ones from The Coffee Sack are nicer!  I shall be back there next week, at whatever time best fits in with the night session at the Australian Open, hoping for better luck 🙂 .

 

 

(This is here more than once because I was trying to get the picture to display on Facebook.  The picture display went funny after a recent app update.  But I sorted out.  But now it transpires that the work-round only works on posts with small titles.  So I’ll now have to share long-titled posts on Facebook with abbreviated titles, then put the long titles back.  Oh well!)

 

Free tea, anxious toes, Handforth headlines, BYOB and repaying Sybil

We now live in a world in which TV travel programmes feature the delights of … Weatherfield.  Seriously.  I’m not holding my breath for sojourns to exotic climes this year, but I’m hoping that, by the summer, I’ll at least be able to go a bit further than Media City.  Not that there’s anything wrong with Media City, I hasten to add.  Joanna Lumley, who was presenting the programme, was very lucky to be able to sit in the Rovers Return with Ken Barlow, because future scripts are being rewritten, so it looks as if the Rovers’ll be back to doing takeaways only.  Rather like The Coffee Sack near chez moi.  I have only recently discovered that the said Coffee Sack does the most lovely scones.  However, this morning, when I went in, disaster struck.  There were no scones.  The man said that, not expecting many customers in this awful weather, he’d only made half a dozen, and someone had come in and bought the lot.  How dare they?!

I must have looked so devastated, even behind the mask, that he said I could have a cup of tea for free.  I did offer to pay for it – it’s not as if he’s contractually obliged to provide me with a weekly scone, after all – but no, he insisted.  Free tea, to make up for the disappointment!   How nice is that?  It’s little things like that which make this very difficult time bearable.  As for the person who bought six scones, I shall assume that they were either a) very hungry or b) part of a large household, rather than that they were planning anything nefarious.  Welcome to Lockdown-land, in which buying six scones could be construed as being suspicious.  Anyway.  Three cheers for free cups of tea!

As for anxious toes, one of the many weird things about living with anxiety is that random bits of you start to hurt even though there isn’t very much physically wrong with them.  On Thursday night, whilst moving the furniture in the front room around so that I could hoover, I stubbed my toe on the settee.  Ouch.  Then I woke up at two o’clock in the morning, in so much pain with this toe that I had to take two ibuprofen.  I knew jolly well that it was anxiety pains and not actual pains, because stubbed toes do not still hurt eight hours later, but this is what happens.  It can be knees, backs, stomachs, whatever.  I don’t even know exactly what it was all about, and this is something else that happens.  Was it anxiety about how fat I am?  Scones aside, I am really trying hard to lose weight, but it’s not working 😦 .  Was it because my car was going in for its MOT that day?  Was it to do with phone updates (these stress me out like mad)?  Was it to do with the Australian Open?  Quite possibly: I am extremely stressed about Rafa’s bad back.  But I don’t actually know.  So, if anyone’s reading this, and knows how to read the minds of anxious toes, do please let me know.

Pretty much everyone’s a bit stressed out at the moment.  That’s why it’s so nice to be on the receiving end of an act of kindness such as the free cup of tea.  It was particularly nice because there has been quite a bit of nastiness around in recent days.  The worst of it was from the small minority of people who tried to use the death of Captain Sir Tom Moore to attack the government and score political points, and even, in the case of one vile vicar, to accuse the whole country of being racist.  What is wrong with some people?  Whatever your political views may be, don’t start dragging the death of a lovely, kind-hearted old man who lifted everyone’s spirits into them.  I just hope that the Moore family weren’t too upset by it.

Please be nice to people.  It’s upsetting to be criticised because you’ve bought something from Amazon, even though most other shops are closed and it’s none of anyone else’s business where you buy from anyway, or for trying to cheer yourself up with a nice cake which happened to be served a polystyrene box, and even more upsetting when, after congratulating someone on their work being featured in a national newspaper, someone attacks both of you because the newspaper concerned doesn’t meet with their approval.  Then there are the people slagging off anyone hoping to go on holiday this summer as being irresponsible.  These comments come from people who live in rural areas and don’t work, needless to say, not from people who are chained to office computers for five days a week and are getting rather tired of only being able to walk round housing estates and the same local parks in their little free time.   We need a break, OK.

But there are a lot of lovely people out there.  And free tea is much appreciated!

Rest in peace, Captain Sir Tom.  You were a wonderful man.  And I was also sad to hear of the death of Christopher Plummer.  I would so have married Captain von Trapp, although I’m not sure about taking on seven children.  And, yes, I do know that he got frustrated about for ever being associated with The Sound of Music, but what a wonderful film with which to be associated!  I just typed “to be associated with”, looked at it in horror, and correct it!

To go back to the MOT, hooray, my car passed without needing anything more than a new windscreen wiper blade.  Strange times at the garage, though.  No chairs for customers.  Everything to be taken out of the car.  And I was sent several e-mails asking me to drive to the garage with all the windows open, to let the air circulate, but I’m afraid that I ignored those.  The garage is only three miles away, but there are a lot of traffic lights between here and there, and sitting in a stationary car with all the windows open is really not a good idea, especially when you’re a lone female.  Sorry, garage.  But I did stick to all your other rules.

Other things happening this week have included a video of a meeting of Handforth Parish Council going viral.  You know, Handforth, where the big John Lewis is?  Remember that, from the olden days, when we used to do things like going to shops.  I met my cousin for a drink in the cafe there once.  Remember those days?  Not only could you go into shops, but you could sit down in cafes, and you could even meet your friends and relations!   I feel like I should have the Hovis advert music playing.

Local elections are to go ahead, but it’ll be BYOB.  No, not bring your own bottle.  Bring your own biro.

And there’s also been talk of extending the term over which the government support loans for businesses hit by restrictions are to be repaid.  There are two different types of loans available to affected small businesses, depending on which one best suits their circumstances – the bounceback loans, and the Coronavirus Business Interruption Loans.  Due to HMRC’s obsession with acronyms, the latter are known as CBILs, pronounced “Sybils”.  We are in a severe economic crisis, thanks to this horrible virus, and it’s feared that up to 15% of small businesses may not survive.  There’s certainly nothing funny about it.  But, every time I hear someone going on about “Sybils”, I half-expect Prunella Scales to turn up and start shouting at John Cleese to repay his loan.  A small hotel would definitely need a loan.  But let’s hope that we’ll be back in small hotels, or any other accommodation of your choice, this summer.

In the meantime, here’s to tea and scones.  Oh, and I got a scone from M&S in the end.  But the ones from The Coffee Sack are nicer!  I shall be back there next week, at whatever time best fits in with the night session at the Australian Open, hoping for better luck 🙂 .

 

 

(This is here more than once because I was trying to get the picture to display on Facebook.  The picture display went funny after a recent app update.  But I sorted out.  But now it transpires that the work-round only works on posts with small titles.  So I’ll now have to share long-titled posts on Facebook with abbreviated titles, then put the long titles back.  Oh well!)

 

Manchester monsoons, Melbourne mice, park perambulations and lockdown locks

  2020 was The Year Without Wimbledon. This is The January Without The Australian Open.  And, on top of the plague, we’ve now got floods.  Sounds a bit Biblical, doesn’t it?  I think it’s fair to say that this year has not got off to the best of starts.  The Northwich/Warrington/Lymm area seems to have borne the brunt of the floods, although other areas have been affected too, and it’s very sad to see the pictures of the chaos caused.  Twelve cars were submerged just a few miles down the road from here, and people in parts of Didsbury and Northenden were evacuated.

It’s never the best time of year anyway, and what normally gets me through it is the Australian Open … but that’s been delayed by three weeks, and the build-up has turned into utter chaos.  There are now reports that the Olympics could be cancelled, and it can’t be a coincidence that these are emerging just after all the chaos over the Aussie Open kicked off.  Tennis Australia put a huge amount of effort into making the arrangements, but I don’t think anyone anticipated that people who’d tested negative 72 hours before flying would then test positive after arriving.  Everyone who was on a flight with those affected, and three different flights were involved, is now confined to their hotel rooms, rather than, as originally planned, being able to go out to practise for five hours a day.  And some of the rooms have got mice in them.  And there are all sorts of rows going on over social media, with everyone and their dog shoving their oar in.   What a nightmare.

Also, I just panicked when I saw that Coronation Street had had to pause filming for a fortnight as scripts need to be adjusted due to the latest lockdown, but, phew, it’s not going to affect the number of episodes shown.

Meanwhile, we’re pretty much confined to barracks, but we are allowed out to exercise, and I’m very grateful for having Heaton Park within walking distance – and for the fact that I’ve discovered that a café which I pass on my way there does excellent scones.  I know – no wonder I’m so fat 😦 .  The park’s like the social hub of the community – it’s a bit like the days when the upper classes would go riding out in Hyde Park to see and be seen!  Walk round the park for long enough, and you’ll see all sorts of people you know.

The daffodil shoots in the park are coming through now, though … although they aren’t growing as fast as my hair (which is also greying … meaning that I’m going to have to start using that awful spray-on hair dye as well).  I’m looking forward to seeing the spring flowers.  We’ve still got flowers.  And United are top of the league!  And we’ve still got each other.  It’s sad that some people seem to use social media primarily to post hatred – why hate people so much, just because they vote for a different political party to you – but most people use it to connect with relatives and friends, and hopefully that’ll get us through it.   And, all being well, we will get the Australian Open in February!  It always ends in tears.  Well, nearly always.  It first broke my heart in 1990, and, with a few exceptions, notably in 2009, it’s done the same most years ever since.  But at least it’ll be something to focus on.  And then the snowdrops and the daffodils will come …

 

Tier 3 Plus, Week 1 – December 7th to 13th 2020 inclusive

Monday, December 7th

Hooray!   Two small Christmas markets are to open in town.  I might go on Friday: I’m having the day off because they won’t let us carry our holidays forward, and, with cinemas, museums etc all closed, there’s very little else to do.

There were pictures of packed crowds outside Harrods over the weekend.  How come so many people can afford to shop at Harrods?!  Desperate cafe/restaurant owners in Tier 3 areas are demanding to know how come this is OK and yet they can’t have customers in to sit at socially distanced tables.  The government, natch, couldn’t care less.

Infection rates continue to fall across Greater Manchester, hooray!  But, worryingly, the rate of increase in our borough has slowed right down – it’s still down week on week, but actually up between mid-week and the end of the week.  We’ve now got the second-highest rate of the ten boroughs, and are really letting the side down.  It could be due to a particular factor such as an outbreak at a school, but nothing’s been said.

Prince William and Kate are touring the country on the Royal Train.  Hopefully this’ll be a morale booster.  Politicians are not welcome, but Royals are 🙂 .

Level 4 restrictions in Scotland are to end.  Lucky Scotland!  But infection rates in Wales, especially South Wales, are rising, and the situation’s also worrying in parts of Europe.  We hear next to nothing about what’s happening in Africa, Asia or South America … except for the England cricket tour of South Africa having to end early due to members of both teams, and hotel staff, testing positive.

 

Tuesday, December 8th

The vaccine roll-out’s started!   A 90-year-old lady called Margaret Keenan received her first shot of the Pfizer-BioNTech vaccine this morning, in Coventry.  Hopefully this is the beginning of the end.  (And not the end of the beginning.)

I know this is really exciting, but it’s hard to be excited when, after plunging for the last few weeks, infection rates in our borough have somehow started creeping up again.  WHY is this happening?  They’re down everywhere else, even Oldham and Rochdale which’d been struggling so badly.  Hopefully it’s just a blip, maybe a cluster at a school or something, but we aren’t being given any info.  With tier levels due to be reviewed next week, this is just the last thing we need.  It’s like we’ve been progressing along the snakes and ladders board and have now slipped right back down a snake.  Infection rates in Greater Manchester as a whole are down, and now below those in Greater London, but I’m really worried about what’s going on here.

William and Kate visited Manchester yesterday, and have now been reunited with the Queen, Charles and Camilla, Anne, and Edward and Sophie at Windsor Castle.  Sadly, whilst they were welcomed by the people they met, the tour’s been marred by the ill-mannered Nicola Sturgeon and the equally ill-mannered Vaughan Gething (the Welsh Health Minister) pretty much saying that they weren’t welcome, and Downing Street failing to give the appropriate backing.  You can’t do right for doing wrong, sometimes.

Scottish Higher exams have been cancelled.

So have trains from Switzerland to Italy.

And, following the affair of the Danish mink, we now have the Catalan lions.  Sounds like a rugby team.  But it’s not funny- four lions at a zoo in Barcelona have tested positive for coronavirus.

And I am off to finish writing my Christmas cards before watching United v Leipzig.

 

Later – oh FFS.  We made such a great start to this year’s Champions League, and now we’re out at the group stage.  Just like this year hasn’t been bad enough!

 

Wednesday, December 9th

Some statistics for infection rates per 100,000 head of population:

Coventry (Midlands) – 134
Bristol (West Country) – 141
Leeds (Yorkshire) – 144
Newcastle (North East) – 146
Greater Manchester (North West) – 159

All of these areas have been placed into Tier 3, with travel restrictions imposed and hospitality businesses forced to close.

London – 183
Luton (just outside London, airport named “London Luton”) – 287

Both of these areas have been placed into Tier 2, where travel restrictions have not been imposed and hospitality businesses are open.

Yep.  That just sums up the Westminster bubble’s attitude towards anywhere outside the London area, doesn’t it?

The issues in our borough are apparently due to a cluster in one small area – obviously not good news, but at least it’s a cluster not a general thing, so hopefully things will improve next week.  Things are levelling off in other areas too, though 😦 .  So sick of the whole bloody thing.

A Russian health official’s said that people shouldn’t drink alcohol for 56 days after receiving the Sputnik vaccine.  Other officials are panicking and saying that it’s only 3 days.  The thought of 56 days with no vodka is not going down very well.

And today is Coronation Street’s 60th anniversary.

 

Thursday, December 10th

Andy Burnham’s suggested that Greater Manchester could be split.  If I were in Trafford, Stockport or Tameside, I would certainly be very annoyed if I were kept in Tier 3 due to higher rates in Bury and Rochdale, but splitting the area would be a complete nightmare.  What about town?  And Salford?  Gah, why does there have to be this stupid bloody cluster just now?  Things were going so well until the middle of last week.  It’s not even anywhere near us!  It’s due to outbreaks in two care homes and a school in one small area: rates in every other part of the borough are falling.  Just hope things improve.  Please, please let Greater Manchester, the North East and West Yorkshire all be moved into Tier 2.   And please don’t punish us because of a cluster in one small area.

Meanwhile, London now has the highest infection rate of any region (region, not county) in England.   When Leicester had the highest rate, it was practically sealed off.  When Bolton did, its hospitality businesses were closed down.  When Blackburn did, some businesses there were not allowed to reopen when those in the same sector could everywhere else.  When Oldham did, restrictions on people meeting family and friends were tightened, and the same with Liverpool when it did.  But, in London, no additional restrictions – just extra resources chucked at it so that all secondary school pupils can be tested!   I’ve got nothing against London itself, or the people who live there, but it’s one rule for them and one rule for everyone else, and it’s just not on.

And, just to add to the gloom, it looks as if the spiteful EU is going to ban British tourists “because of Covid” once the transition period ends on January 1st.  It’s hard to believe that places like Spain, Italy, Portugal and Greece, which desperately need to get tourists back in, will stick to this, but … well, it’s not very good, is it?   Still no deal, and talks are due to end on Monday.  FFS, this has been going on for 4 1/2 years.  Even the negotiations to bring about the treaties at the end of the First World War, the Second World War and the Napoleonic Wars took nothing like this long!

Theresa May had a deal.  The stupid, stupid MPs in the last parliament rejected it.  I hope they’re pleased with themselves.

Secondary schools and further education colleges in London are to close again – online teaching only from Monday.

And Kay Burley, who more or less accused Andy Burnham of causing people’s deaths, and carried on as if Dominic Cummings committed the crime of the century by driving from London to Barnard Castle, has been taken off air for six months after going out to a restaurant with a group of friends and colleagues in London, then asking them back to hers.  Inzy Rashid and Beth Rigby, who were also there, have both been taken off air for three months.  But I bet they’re all on full pay.  What a load of hypocrites!  Having said which, it does seem a bit much, considering that people like Margaret Ferrier have done far worse and got off scot-free.

I’m doing a lot of moaning, aren’t I?!  Just so fed up.  Why does there have to be this stupid cluster just now?!

 

Friday, December 11th

We get so few days off, and I usually drive myself mad as to how best to use them.  The 2 days I’d saved for December were meant to be for a Christmas market break abroad.  Instead, I spent today at the “Christmas mini-markets” in town, and then having a quick look round the Trafford Centre.  They were very mini mini-markets, but at least we’ve got something.  The local economy’s shrunk by 15% since this nightmare began.  Every little that people can earn helps.  And it was nice to have a walk round.

Large swathes of the Trafford Centre car parks have been closed off, to stop it getting too busy.  This might have been a good idea if they’d announced in the local media and in signs on the motorway that they were doing it.  Instead, the first you knew about it was when you got there.  I managed to park without too much trouble in the end, but I can see it being chaos tomorrow!   It’s usually so crowded there in December that it’s hard to move, one of the reasons I much prefer town, so in one way it was nice to be able to walk round without all that, but obviously it’s not so great for the shops.

The national R rate is unfortunately going up again, because of the issues in London, Essex and Kent.  The BBC website said today that schools in the North will be “irritated” that they’ve been left struggling to try to contain infections for months, whilst every stop’s being pulled out now that infection rates in schools in London are so high.  This isn’t the Manchester Evening News, the Lancashire Telegraph or the Yorkshire Post talking.  This is the BBC saying that London’s getting preferential treatment and the government’s discriminating against the North.

Dame Barbara Windsor’s died, aged 83 😦 .

Some better news – the self-isolation period’s to be reduced from 14 days to 10 days.  Good!

 

Saturday, December 12th

What a damp squib of a derby match!  0-0, and very few chances.  It’s over 9 months since the last Old Trafford derby, the last match I went to.  When will I be back there?  Still, on current form, most people were saying City would thrash us, so a draw’s not too bad!

This morning, I went to the markets at the Lowry, or the Quayside or whatever we’re meant to call it these days.  The actual shopping centre was almost deserted – and this is less than a fortnight before Christmas!   The markets were quite good – better than the ones in town yesterday, in fact.  Unfortunately, though, it was raining.  It’s very hard when the weather’s crap and you can’t go to the cinema, the theatre, a museum or a gallery, or even sit inside a cafe.  It did dry up later, though.

I didn’t think that the Festival of Trees (to raise money for the children’s hospice) was on this year, but it was, so it was nice to see that.

I am SO fat.  I lost a lot of weight when we were in lockdown, but it’s all gone back on and I can’t seem to get any off.  Bleurgh.  I walk and walk and walk, and still it doesn’t help.

The NASUWT (the schoolteachers’ union)’s asked why all this testing in London, Essex and Kent’s never been offered to schools in the North and Midlands, which have just been left to struggle for months.  It’s also emerged that the SAGE advisory committee told the government months ago that Greater Manchester needed additional support … and that the government ignored them and hushed it up.

 

Sunday, December 13th

It has rained nearly all day.  Oh, to be able to go to the cinema or the theatre,  or even to sit inside a cafe.  I’ve got loads of books to read and things to watch, but I can’t stay in all day, so I’ve been for a walk round Hollingworth Lake, and then for a walk to one of the local takeaways for a hot chocolate.  There were a lot of people walking around despite the rain.

I’m hoping that the spike may have peaked.  That’s very poor English, but I can’t think how else to put it!  Even with the spike, our borough’s infection rate is way below the average for London, which now stands at around 240 per 100,000.  Yet cinemas, theatres, cafes, restaurants and pubs are open there, whilst they’re closed in Greater Manchester, where the average rate is now around 160.  And in Stratford-on-Avon, where it’s around 65.  I know I keep going on about this, but so does everyone else.

Germany’s going back into full lockdown, until January 10th.

The deadline for the Brexit talks has been extended.  Again.  Come on, folks, sort it!  Apart from that bloody idiot Macron, no-one wants a no-deal Brexit.  Surely it must be possible to reach some sort of compromise?

And so endeth another week!

 

 

 

 

The coronavirus era arrives in Coronation Street and Emmerdale

Are you allowed to remove your mask in a hospital setting, whilst talking to your ex-fiancé, who’s just been run over whilst pushing you out of the way of a car, about the fact that he murdered a loan shark and buried him in the woods?  Sarah Barlow, formerly Platt, nee Tilsley, did.  I don’t understand why she’s even bothering with Gary, when she’s married to Adam, but never mind.  Meanwhile, the Rovers Return, Roy’s Rolls, Speed Daal and, presumably, the Bistro – there are a lot of food outlets in Coronation Street! – are now only doing take-aways.  Does this include Betty’s hotpot?  The factory is making PPE for the NHS, nurse Aggie Bailey was unable to celebrate her 30th wedding anniversary due to having to self-isolate, Maria is desperately trying to keep up with the demand for haircuts after the salon was finally able to reopen, and Gemma regretted that social distancing meant that she couldn’t hug Abi after inadvertently upsetting her.  Over in Emmerdale, now back to proper episodes after the lockdown specials (some of which were OK, some of which were dire), it’s also take-aways only, and two characters played by high-risk actresses (Claire King, who’s got rheumatoid arthritis, and Michelle Hardwick, who’s pregnant) have disappeared, one on a business trip and one to stay with relatives.

None of the child actors are allowed to feature at the moment, either, because children require chaperones on set and that would mean more people.  Noah and Sarah in Emmerdale have been around, but I assume that those scenes were filmed pre-lockdown.  The Coronation Street teen gang of Amy, Asha, Aadi, Summer and Kelly, who are great and who had been at the centre of two plots, are out of the picture, as are all actors aged over 70 or those who are high-risk for other reasons.

It’s easy to explain that Gemma can’t hug Abi because of social distancing, and there are social distancing signs up in the cafe and the factory, but it’s a bit more difficult to explain why characters can’t get too close to their partners, children, parents or siblings!  However, social distancing didn’t stop Amy in Emmerdale from arranging a date with Lee, even if it was only in the hope that it’d make Victoria realise that she wanted Lee back.  Come to that, it didn’t stop Sarah and Charity from breaking into Priya’s house.  However, there must have had to be a fair bit of last minute rewriting.  Yasmeen in Coronation Street has even had a heart attack to explain why her courtroom appearance couldn’t take place!

Ironically, EastEnders, the one soap which usually likes to mention current events, is off air at the moment.  But, when it’s back, presumably it’ll be the same there.  The scriptwriters had to do this: soap world might not be the real world (how many people do you know whose ex-fiances murder loan sharks and bury them in woods?) but it has to mirror it to a reasonable extent.  So our favourite characters are going through it all with us!

It is very, very weird, though, watching it and knowing that neither we, the characters, the actors nor the scriptwriters have any idea what is going to happen.  Now, over 35 years after I first read The Chalet School in Exile, I know a tiny bit – obviously the pandemic is hardly to be compared with the risk of a Nazi invasion, but the uncertainty is comparable – about how it must have felt for Elinor M Brent-Dyer to write that, and for her readers to read it.

Strange times.

Strange times indeed.